1. Welcome to the Foot Health Forum community where you can ask about foot problems and get help, as well as be up-to-date with the latest foot health information. Only registered members can ask a question, but you do not need to register to respond and give help. Please become part of the community (here) and check out the shop.

Always Get Checked for Equinus

Discussion in 'Ask your questions here' started by Ankle_Pain, Oct 10, 2019.

  1. Ankle_Pain

    Ankle_Pain New Member

    I don't see many members talking about equinus, so I thought I'd bring it up with the hope that it will help "someone" out there.

    Equinus is the inability to properly dorsiflex the ankle. (silfverskiold test)

    Many foot conditions "can develop" due to compensation of equinus.

    For example:


    Plantar fasciitis (arch/heel pain)
    Calf cramping
    Tendonitis (inflammation in the Achilles tendon)
    Metatarsalgia (pain and/or callusing on the ball of the foot)
    Flatfoot
    Arthritis of the midfoot (middle area of the foot)
    Pressure sores on the ball of the foot or the arch
    Bunions and hammertoes
    Ankle pain
    Shin splints

    Be sure when a foot or ankle ailment leads you to a Podiatrist's or Foot and Ankle Surgeon's office, they check your dorsiflexion for equinus.

    I've seen a plethora of Certified Foot and Ankle Surgeons and Podiatrists and not one checked me for equinus during the past several years.

    When I finally came across the silfverskiold test online, after years of suffering with various pathologies, I found that I lacked dorsiflexion. When I asked my Podiatrist about it, he said "everyone has equinus to some degree."

    I insisted that he check me and voila, the root of most of my pathology was equinus. The Podiatrist looked embarrassed that he had not caught this sooner and more surprising that no one else had, either.

    Keep in mind that equinus doesn't cause everything and anything wrong with the feet/ankles, but it "can" at times be responsible for many conditions.

    I wish everyone the best of luck with their foot and ankle issues.


     
Loading...

Share This Page