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Best treatment for small plantar fibroma?

Discussion in 'Ask your questions here' started by lky123, Sep 8, 2010.

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  1. The Ripper

    The Ripper Guest


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    Holy ****! I have actually done this home procedure as outlined on page one (1) of this thread at least three (3) times to small, pea size fibromas on the ball and heal of my left foot, one of which was a repeat procedure after the fibroma returned. I have had complete success with the method of extraction that I previously outlined. I am not describing a procedure that should be used with large fibromas which require professional surgical attention

    No numbing of the skin is necessary, as you will only be cutting the top layer of skin where there are no nerves. It will bleed quite a bit, as you begin to pry up on the fibroma, so have some paper towels handy. The actual extraction , as previously described in not painful. After 5-10 minutes following extraction of the fibroma, the bleeding will slow and a large bandage, or gauze with tape can be applied to the foot.

    As I described previously, when you first remove the bandage the next day, normally after bed rest, you will have a "hole" completely through the skin of the foot exposing "proud flesh". The hole in the skin will fill in very quickly. No stitches are needed, and no scar or evidence of the extraction will be evident after the wound fully heals and the scar tissue wears away. Just keep the wound bandaged with fresh bandages for the time period previously described.
     
  2. The Ripper

    The Ripper Guest

    This is The Ripper's original posting which has been the source of some controversy in this thread. This procedure works for me. I am not diabetic, have no other risk factors, and never had any infection from this procedure, despite not using any topical medication. As noted you should proceed at your own risk, should you choose to do so. I promise no safe outcome for others.
     
  3. The Ripper

    The Ripper Guest

    One, girl, your opinion of me is acknowledged and I respectfully disagree, as it is formed through preconception and ignorance, as you have no experience with the procedure I describe. I am not advocating that anyone necessarily perform this procedure. I describe only what worked for me. I would not have posted this, had the procedure I describe not been completely and successfully on three occasions (except for growing it back once), with no complications other than a sore foot while walking during the first two days following extraction while wearing a bandage. I am sorry if you were somehow offended.
     
  4. The Ripper

    The Ripper Guest

    I see that there is another DIY - "IDIOT" on this thread. When I was in my 20's I had a very small (1-2 mm) fibroma on my finger that I excised multiple times before it went away. The pea sized plantar fibromas that I had in my 40's and 50's were probably 50-70 mm in diameter range. Like you describe, lots of blood, not much pain, and no infection if you are careful. Congratulations!!
     
  5. The Ripper

    The Ripper Guest

    Your words of caution are certainly welcome. While Patient Heal Thyself used an X-ACTO knife to cut the skin, I recommend cuticle scissors to cut the skin around the fibroma. I would suggest that there is little chance of severing any type of artery using scissors to merely cut the skin or epidermis, possibly slightly into the dermis (where pain begins), while never getting anywhere near the hypodermis, where digital arteries are located.
     
  6. The Ripper

    The Ripper Guest

    You may be correct, however, warts normally are known to grow on top of the shin, and my "warts" or "fibroma" were under the skin causing a round small bulge under the skin. Needless to say, I am not talking about a large lump on my arch, which apparently the type of problem that many have described. I am discussing small pea size, 50-70 mm. growths under the skin. Call them what you wish.....
     
  7. The Ripper

    The Ripper Guest

    It has been quite a while, but "The Ripper" has returned to the Forum, and I'm searching for "blathering fools" who troll medical forums with nothing to say like yourself. I am not on antibiotics, nor am I in a wheelchair. My condition, plantar warts or fibroma, take your pick, has not returned for the past seven (7) years. I have no scars or ill effects from excising the small plantar fibromas or warts from my foot.
    Cheers Newbie.
     
  8. The Ripper

    The Ripper Guest

    I have accurately described my condition, and I can hardly believe that someone with a golf ball sized tumor in their arch could possibly be confused with anything that I have written. I wasn't professionally diagnosed, but as I have stated, my condition grew under the skin, not on top of the skin, leading me to suspect that it was a "fibroma". In addition, I have had a neurofibroma removed from my back. The plantar "fibromas," or "warts" that I describe are pea sized and were on the ball and heal of my foot. If this does not apply to you, please disregard these posts.
     
  9. Lisa

    Lisa Guest

     
  10. Lisa

    Lisa Guest


    Who was your Doctor in NYC that did PRP for your plantar fibroma? I am a runner and I have a plantar fibroma. I live in NYC. I am trying to find a way to get rid of this. Thanks.
     
  11. Bonnie

    Bonnie Guest

     
  12. Bonnie

    Bonnie Guest

    I too have small plantar fibroma bumps on arch of both feet. Agree on lack of solutions from Podiatrist. I have had numerous treatments, PRP, (plasma,rich Platelet), ART, Active release, custom orthodics, &Dry needling, t with no success. Never had steriods having read they are only a bandaid. At present I'm using verapimnal cream, for a month now, no sign of decrease in size of bumps yet. Thinking of either the Tenex Health, using ultrasound needle to blast them apart, or the cryogenics. Intend to try another foot clinic to see if they can give me answer on which of the two to try. Keep me informed what you end up with. Thanks!
     
  13. Foggy76

    Foggy76 New Member


    Bonnie - I'd be curious to hear more about your research on Tenex. It's something I'm also considering right now. I've gone the cortisone injections route as well as other conservative options, but it's not making much of an impact. Do you have a physician in mind?
     
  14. Tarl

    Tarl Guest

    Well I've been following this thread with much interest. I'm not a runner per se, I do, however, work out and try to stay in shape for my age. In my younger years I was a competitive bodybuilder so running was a part of contest training but now I do it very rarely due to a shattered ankle injury that still has 3 screws in it received many years ago.

    So I do low impact stuff, weights, bodyweight exercises....walk..etc.

    I do ride high performance motorcycles and I do like to sit on the bike, tight, like a coiled spring with the pegs under my toes, belly against the tank and I use bodyweight along with push/pull to steer the bike. My feet are always contorted in such a way that the toes or balls of my feet are constantly exerting great force on the solid foot pegs of the motorcycle.

    This puts a lot of stress on the plantar fascia area of the foot and many times over the years my feet (I didn't realize it then, but do now after all this research), either both or the left or right one, become tender/painful after a strenuous or long ride.

    Due to other endeavors, not having the time and shoulder surgery I have not ridden much lately. I decided to start easing into the riding and try to do it at least once a week. Riding these beasts is like working out, you gotta start slow, and acclimate to the demands it has on your body, especially if we're starting to reach the mid to late 50s.

    Rode once, 30 miles, about 45 minutes, got back, my left foot hurt, the planta fascia area (mainly in the arch). I was still able to work out, it went away after about a day of tenderness. Next week came, rode again, same route, about the same time also. Got back, my right foot hurt this time and I was limping, so a little more strain put on it then last week.

    The next day I was limping around, taking an ibuprofen and I went to massage the area under my right foot, wow, there was a nodule there. Under the skin, about the size of a pea or so. Very prominent when you look at it, you can't miss it, also it was blue in color, almost like a vein. The areas around the nodule hurt also. So thought it was a blood clot, initially. Then started googling it, found all kinds of pics online, forums, blogs.....you name it. One of those searches led me to here. Great reading by the way all.

    1 week went by, still hurt limping, 2 week, same, slightly better...by the 4th week I could almost walk normal, but if barefoot or even with shoes if something worked it's way into the arch area of my foot and pressed it, pain. Tried various things, ice it, gently massage it, stretch. Ultimately at 5 weeks, could walk and you didn't see a limp and with my NB shoes with gel sole...I was almost feeling normal, but the nodule was still there, blue, noticeable and painful if you pressed it. Felt almost like you had a rock constantly I your shoe, or under the foot. Not so much painful now as it had been no limping unless I was walking a long distance or standing on it a lot....but I didn't like it....prior to that last ride I had been working out on a 13 week cycle, no missed workouts, steady, strong gait, no foot problems at all....so I was somewhat concerned now that this nodule was not going away.

    Finally decided to see the doctor, general practice one. She said she thought it was a ganglion cyst. She referred me to a foot doctor (whom I know since my wife was his patient). Saw him and he looked, we discussed it and he said didn't think it was a ganglion, but could be a fibroma...he suggested we ultra sound it and see. I agreed, we did, once looking at it he said it displays some symptoms of a fibroma but also seems to have a possible fluid component. Fibromas usually don't have any fluid....the only way to be sure, put a needle in and try to drain it. He said we didn't have to, we could wait and see what happens but he suggested we try. I said OK.

    Once we did it, he squeezed, and of course (even with numbing shots) it hurt, so I can only imagine how hard he was squeezing...but the fluid component of it, DARK BLOOD. Apparently it was a clot, somehow either something got torn or damaged in or near/around the fascia and it bled, but the blood got walled off and formed a clot. He squeezed, more pain, more dark blood came out....ultimately after numerous squeezes the initial size of 9cm went down to less than 3 to 4 cm. We ultra sounded it again 2 times and whereas before you couldn't compress it, now you can push and it completely compresses flat....so he said lets monitor it but it didn't appear to be a full blown fibroma and it wasn't a ganglion cyst....but it had been cyst like but more like a clot.

    So I haven't looked or felt it yet since then, it is compression bandaged and he said leave that on for a few hours....but it didn't appear to be serious and we can follow up in a month if needed. I am however limping again, lol [​IMG] since I had numerous needles stuck into my foot (oh the trauma) and some massive squeezing. Let you know how it goes after some days.

    So, sometimes you just gotta have it checked by a foot doctor.
     
  15. Tarl

    Tarl Guest

    Well just a few hours after for this follow-up. Took the bandage off and you can still feel the "lump" or nodule under the skin, you can still even see it - but it is very soft now and pliable. Almost like when a balloon has been full of air for so long then you let the air out, so what was full is now empty but that stretched out tissue is still there like a limp balloon. Still have tenderness from the needle sticks but doesn't feel like any pain, not like before. So hopefully the coming days it continues to shrink or become even flatter....it seems to be much better. Let me give it a few days to see.
     
  16. Well, I think I've read just about every forum I can find. This one with all the name calling might be the most entertaining.
    I am or was an avid runner. I've had a fibroma on my plantar tendon for about 2 1/2 years now. At the time it first surfaced I was in a walking cast due to a bruised bone in my foot. I noticed some arch pain so I put an over the shelf orthotic my cast. After 8 weeks or so I came out of the cast and the fibroma was pretty much gone, the bone in my foot was feeling healed and I started to slowly run again.
    Then... it came back. With a vengeance swelling up, hurt to walk and I went to the doc about it. The surgeon diagnosed as superficial plantar fibromatosis. No surgery is recommended and to basically leave it alone. I tried topical medications I.e. anti inflamatories, chiropractic care, graston, message, orthotics, cortisone injection (I do not reccomend to anyone, it's a waste of money and time and in my mind it's not helping you heal) acupuncture and on and on. Nothing helped. I was also continuing to run. I run a lot when I am training. Long miles, lots of mountains and trails... leaving it alone was accomplishing nothing.
    After another year I tried a new foot surgeon. This diagnosis was slightly different. - plantar fasciitis variation with a fibroma like formation. From this doctor I tried Extracorpeal Shockwave Therapy.
    Now, ESWT did not cure anything... but it helps. I have now sat on my rear end resting my foot for 5 months. It is a little better and showing some improvements.
    This is what I think is going on - (please keep in mind I believe doctors use the word fibroma very loosely. This can cause problems obviously on an Internet forum. It can mean Ledderhose or a contracture disease or a cyst like scar tissue formation, or something else)
    So in my situation - I believe somewhere along the line I damaged my plantar fascia. Being a runner, not a huge surprise. However my body went nuts creating scar tissue and this a big lump occurred. So in the end I have a fibroma, but the real problem is that I have a buildup of weakened scar tissue that doesn't work correctly. It heals, I stand up and it tears again and every day the process is repeated... I'm not sure if everyone's symptoms are like mine, but some days it feels like a razor blade is cutting the tendon and on good days the lump is just sore. Activity of any impact is not good.
    I used to leave this thing alone but that's not getting me anywhere so I've jumped full into treating the fibroma as if I have a horrible case of plantar fasciitis (which I think is probably true) which means contrast baths of ice and heat always ending on heat, ultrasound device to stimulate healing, stretch like crazy, do some exercises if you can without stressing the tendon too much, wear a night splint, I found a Bledsoe brace (google it) to be somewhat helpful in reducing swelling or inflammation. And the controversial one - i message the shit out of it. Start with a ultrasound session to warm it up, then use a racquetball or a softer ball to loosen it up a bit, then move onto a golf ball and really dig in there, rolling in multiple directions to loosen the tissue. It will be sore, it will hurt some, and you will need to drink a lot of water to help flush out the loose tissue. Now, I am in the midst of this protocol. Almost all of the shooting/tearing pain I used to deal with has subsided for now. I have been grinding this thing 2-3 times a day for 6 weeks. It is noticeably smaller, and softer. If I work it too hard I take a session off and let it rest. The other part of this method is I always wear orthotics. I hate them, but they help. Make sure the doctor making them, makes them wide, and creates a deep pocket to accommodate the fibroma. (Mine is closer to my heal unfortunately so I walk on this sucker constantly) I believe that stress on the tendon contributes to the increase in size, more microscopic tears of the tendon.
    My hope in all of this is that, the scar tissue that's created will eventually mature and act closer to healthy tissue. I don't think it will ever go away, but perhaps one day my foot will be more or less functional again. I know this - if youve ever thought about just running through it to see how bad it can get, I went down that road and I don't recommend it. It can get very bad. Ive run ultras and many marathons gritting my teeth through the pain and you cannot train outta this injury. So stop and try to deal with it, I wish anyone suuffering from one of these little bastards all the patience in the world. We will need it. Good luck ya'll - cuz this shit can be fu@&ing devastating.
     
  17. Foggy76

    Foggy76 New Member

    Have you considered radiation therapy (RT)? It's standard practice in Europe to treat Ledderhose and becoming more popular in the States. After a failure with a less invasive surgery procedure (Tenex), I'm now undergoing RT in the coming week.
     
  18. Kara Schardt

    Kara Schardt Guest

    I have read that Dr. Ed Davis in San Antonio, TX has had great success with hyaluronidase, which is an enzyme which dissolves excess collagen. I haven't tried this, but am seriously considering it. Apparently people with more recent growths have better success with reduces the fibromas by about 80% with one treatment, whereas that can be achieved with 2-3 treatments for those with older and larger fibromas. Another option in cryosurgery, but it entails some risks that don't seem to exist with hyaluronidase, if you use a podiatrist who has done many of the procedures. Good luck!
     
  19. Gayle W.

    Gayle W. Guest

     
  20. Gayle W.

    Gayle W. Guest

    This is the first time I have seen flip flops as a potential culprit. I never had problems with this until this past year when I started wearing LL Bean flip flops with an ARCH support on them. I kept getting pain in my feer but kept wearing them, duh. I have many pairs of Dansko and find they are VERY painful to wear with my fibromas. I found my big heavy duty winter boots full of sheep fur to be the best but of course now that it is getting warmer I am struggling with what to wear. I know I am replying to a post from 6 years ago but wonder if you have learned anything to share in the last 6 years? I am now blaming the flip flops...Hmmmm.
     
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