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Diabetic with Morton's neuroma

Discussion in 'Ask your questions here' started by Killer Queen, Mar 19, 2009.

  1. Killer Queen

    Killer Queen New Member


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    I'm a 57 year old Type 1 diabetic, living in England.I had problems with pain in the ball of my foot for a couple of years, which was diagnosed as MN about 6 months ago by my podiatrist, confirmed by ultrasound examination as being approx 8x7mm in the 2nd/3rd toe space. I have since been given insoles which helped a little at first. I have just completed a course of 4 alcohol injections, given 2 weeks apart. It's 2 weeks since the last one and there are no plans for any more to be given, I believe because of funding issues, rather than anything specifically related to me.

    Since having the injections, my pain has become steadily worse and I have varying amounts of numbness on my big toe and the next 2 toes. I didn't experience numbness prior to the injections. ( I do not have any diabetic neuropathy) The neuroma remains the same size. Walking any distance more than 50 yards or so is difficult due to pain, and I'm becoming reluctant to go out on foot.

    I am being advised to consider surgery, but am finding it hard to get any information about the specific risks to a diabetic, or even much information about what surgery and post-op period would entail.I am aware that if I have the surgery, my numbness will become permanent, and as a diabetic, feel this isn't something I 'd desire!

    My questions are:
    Are there specific risks for a type one diabetic having this surgery?

    Is it normal to have severe pain 2 weeks following the injections? In a research article in the American Journal of Roentgenology, I read that in a study of 101 patients having alcohol ablation, 17 experienced pain for up to 3 weeks later, but my podiatrist is of the opinion that I am unusual and that the treatment clearly hasn't worked.

    I would be grateful for anyone's thoughts/ advice/ shared experiences.
    Thanks.
     
  2. FootDoc

    FootDoc New Member

    DISCLAIMER:
    THE FOLLOWING IS OFFERED GRATIS AS GENERAL INFORMATION ONLY, AND, AS SUCH, MAY NOT BE APPLICABLE TO THE SPECIFIC QUESTIONER AND/OR HIS/HER PROBLEM. IT IS CLEARLY NOT BASED ON ACTUAL KNOWLEDGE AND/OR EXAMINATION OF THE QUESTIONER OR HIS/HER MEDICAL HISTORY, AND IT CAN NOT AND SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON AS DEFINITIVE MEDICAL OPINION OR ADVICE. ONLY THROUGH HANDS-ON PHYSICAL CONTACT WITH THE ACTUAL PATIENT CAN ACCURATE MEDICAL DIAGNOSIS BE ESTABLISHED AND SPECIFIC ADVICE BE GIVEN. NO DOCTOR/PATIENT RELATIONSHIP IS CREATED OR ESTABLISHED OR MAY BE INFERRED. THE QUESTIONER AND/OR READER IS INSTRUCTED TO CONSULT HIS OR HER OWN DOCTOR BEFORE PROCEEDING WITH ANY SUGGESTIONS CONTAINED HEREIN, AND TO ACT ONLY UPON HIS/HER OWN DOCTOR’S ORDERS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. BY THE READING OF MY POSTING WHICH FOLLOWS, THE READER STIPULATES AND CONFIRMS THAT HE/SHE FULLY UNDERSTANDS THIS DISCLAIMER AND HOLDS HARMLESS THIS WRITER. IF THIS IS NOT FULLY AGREEABLE TO YOU, THE READER, AND/OR YOU HAVE NOT ATTAINED THE AGE OF 18 YEARS, YOU HEREBY ARE ADMONISHED TO READ NO FURTHER.
    ***********************************************************
    Certainly a diabetic generally has some increased risk in respect to most surgeries. Among the risk assessments would be included the determining of how well the diabetes is being controlled (best done by the patient's recent A1C history), and an assessment of both large and small vessel disease status. Healing and other problems related to diabetes are always a consideration, but there are always risk/benefit assessments which must be done prior to all medical treatments whether they be surgical or otherwise. It is the responsibility of the surgeon to make those assessments and to fully inform the patient of the risks. In the event of the surgeon's willingness to operative, it is then the responsibility of the patient to clearly understand those risks and to make an informed decision as whether or not to assume them.
     
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