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still have pain 9 months after avulsion fracture

Discussion in 'Ask your questions here' started by rachel1786, Nov 23, 2017.

  1. rachel1786

    rachel1786 New Member


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    Hi everyone, back in February(20th to be exact) I took a bad fall off a horse. Horse spooked and ran and I knew I was going to come off so I attempted to land on my feet, and hold onto the horse, I did land on my feet, however in the process, I must have rolled the ankle. I was unable to bare any weight on it but drove myself home(since it was my left ankle) and decided I was in too much pain not to get seen so I had my friend take me to the ER, they diagnosed me with a bad sprain, however when I was still unable to put any weight on it a week later, I followed up with an orthopedics. Using the same xrays the er took, he said I had an avulsion fracture (Closed fracture of lateral malleolus). It was 3 weeks before I could manage to put any weight on it. And another 3 before I could walk without crutches. I did 2 months of physical therapy(starting mid April) and started riding again around in May. Some days it feels almost normal, but then there's days like today where its the end of the night and I'm struggling to walk into the kitchen because it hurts so bad.

    So to sum up this novel which probably has way more detail then needed, is it normal to still have this much pain after 9 months? Should I have it checked again? I also still have some discoloration around my ankle.
     
  2. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Member

    The only advice at this stage is to have another course of, probably more aggressive, physical therapy; esp with a physical therapist skilled in mobilization and manipulation.
    If that does not help, then a more thorough follow up with advanced imaging such as MRI is probably indicated.
     
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